LA CROSSE HISTORY
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THE LA CROSSE AREA'S HISTORY, DIGITIZED

Women


Resources

—Women—


Creator:
Tripp, Addie
Description:
Addie Tripp was a single woman, perhaps a domestic servant, who lived with the William Johnson family of Onalaska, Wisconsin, during the Civil War. Her diary describes her daily household tasks for the family and community life during the war. Although the war continued unabated, Tripp's diary is notable for the absence of references to it, revealing its relatively minor impact on a working class woman's daily life. Tripp wrote nearly every day, and her entries slowly chronicle her romance and ultimately her marriage to a local man. The diary volume itself - - a leather-bound book roughly the size of a deck of cards - - included 24 pages of statistical information in the front as well as pages to record one's expenses and other data at the back. We have enhanced the images slightly to make Tripp's penciled entries easier to read. To see a typed version, click "Page & Text" at the upper right while viewing any page.
Addie Tripp Papers. Wisconsin Historical Society. La Crosse Area Research Center (La Crosse SC 106)
Part of the Wisconsin Historical Society's Turning Points in Wisconsin History online project
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Subject:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse -- Students -- Research -- Periodicals
College students -- Research -- United States -- Periodicals
Journals
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Creator:
Rigotti, Katelyn
Description:
This paper examines the work and accomplishments of the La Crosse County Women’s Political Caucus, which operated as a local branch of the state and national organization. Their purpose was to encourage women to run for state and local office, and to provide support and information on campaigning. They also worked to educate the public on important issues like the Equal Rights Amendment and Affirmative Action. This paper focuses on their efforts to secure the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment for the federal and state constitution. My research is a study of the Equal Rights Amendment, and the way it would have impacted the condition of women. There was a lot of opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment for various reasons. Some people understood what changes the amendment would make, while others were making assumptions. This research dissects the reasons people opposed it and the way proponents failed to correct these misconceptions surrounding the amendment, resulting in the lack of successful ratification.
Published as part of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume 21 (2018)
Subject:
Hospitals -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- History
St. Ann's Hospital (La Crosse, Wis.)
Creator:
Larkin, Virginia Marcotte
Description:
Written by Virginia Marcotte Larkin, St. Francis School of Nursing class of 1951 alumnae. St. Ann;s was a maternity hospital established by the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in 1912.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Miyamoto, Bud -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
Bud Miyamoto (b. 1945) spends a majority of his interview remembering his early life in La Crosse, specifically life on the North Side as a Japanese American. Topics include but are not limited to: North Side neighborhood, his (white) mother's background and employment at the Auto-Lite factory, father’s service in the 100th Infantry Battalion during WWII and journey from Hawaii to La Crosse, Camp McCoy, local businesses (the Sweet Shop, the Country Kitchen, and the Riviera Theatre), social life and entertainment (school dances, drag races, movies, county fair, circus, and picnics), recreation and sports (swimming at the North Side Beach, softball at Copeland Park, and fishing on Black River), student rivalries between Central High School and Logan High School, health remedies, religion (St. Luke’s Methodist Church), anti-Japanese racism in town, Black Americans in La Crosse, Moss family, working-class cultures on North Side, Auto-Lite factory, community grief from 1959 lay-offs at Auto-Lite, employment (Manke Hardware Store, M. Lokken & Son Grocery, Neumeister’s Butcher Shop, Guggenbuehl and Nekola, Nelson’s Clothing Store, and Berg’s Pharmacy, Milwaukee Sentinel, the Sweet Shop, andSandy’s fast food), President John F. Kennedy, 1965 Flood, Lower North Side train depot, telephones, medical industry, and local radio.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Gershon, Ernest -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
Ernest Gershon discusses attending the Phy. Ed. program at UWL in the mid-1900s. He speaks about being involved with gymnastics, dance, track and field, taking classes with Hans Reuter, and Reuter's impact on the university. Gershon also discusses gender roles in sports education.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Gerber, Inga -- Interviews
La Crosse Business and Professional Women's Club (La Crosse, Wis.) -- History
La Crosse Business and Professional Women's Club (La Crosse, Wis.) -- Membership
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Equal rights amendments
Women -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- Societies and clubs
Oral history
Description:
Gerber discusses her work history, her concern for equal rights for women, and her long involvement with the La Crosse Business and Professional Women's Club in La Crosse, Wisconsin. She describes the purposes and concerns of the club as well as its history and development.
Description:
Maxine Kroner (b.1927) was born in Dodgeville, WI, but spent her childhood in La Crosse. In her interview, she discusses topics such as the Great Depression, welfare programs, the North Side neighborhood, Catholicism, private education (Aquinas), employment during WWII, teaching, working as a mother, local politics, the YMCA, the polio pandemic, and vaccines.
Tape 2
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Seubert, Patricia -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Neighborhoods -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Recreation -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
United States -- History -- 1945-1953
United States -- History -- 1953-1961
Description:
Pat Seubert (b. 1936) discusses her life in La Crosse, Wisconsin. She focuses on family and neighborhood life and details recreation activities and social life. She also describes changes in society and politics during her lifetime. Topics includ but are not limited to: childhood home, La Crosse neighborhoods, 20th century changing technologies (dishwasher, washing machine), household roles, husband's employment, raising a family, clothing fads, leisure activities, children's extracurricular activities and music tastes, fraternal and social organizations, courtships and friendships, treatment of women (1940s-1970s), relationship and marriage (married 1958), vacations and first car, WWII (homefront), Communism, Korean War, nursing homes and funerals, religious importance, major societal changes (1945-1960s), family ethnicities, and racial and ethnic tensions in La Crosse. Content warning: this interview does contain racist, anti-Black language. Tape 2
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Fitzpatrick, Patricia L. -- Interviews
Families
Neighborhoods -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Recreation -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
United States -- History -- 1945-1953
United States -- History -- 1953-1961
Description:
Fitzpatrick discusses growing up in La Crosse, Wisconsin. She details family life and marriage; neighborhoods where she grew up and raised her own family; recreation activities; and local social life and practices.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Oswalt, Sally -- Interviews
La Crosse Business and Professional Women's Club (La Crosse, Wis.) -- History
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Equal rights amendments
Equal pay for work
Women -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- Societies and clubs
Women's health services -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Health care reform
Description:
Oswalt discusses her involvement with the La Crosse Business and Professional Women's Club and efforts to achieve wage equality and health care reform and to improve the status of women in the workplace and society.
Subject:
Prostitution -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- History
Creator:
Gehle, Milton G.
Description:
It is the purpose of this paper to show through the use of documentary evidence that prostitution did exist in La Crnsse between 1876 and 1913. Further, those methods of arrest and conviction used to legally stop or attempt to stop individuals involved in the vice were often quite sloppy by modern standards of "legal justice,."
UW-L Seminar Paper
Subject:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Social classes -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Women -- Education (Higher) -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Women -- Social conditions
Equality
Creator:
Cronan, Kyle
Description:
Undergraduate paper compiled for a UWL class.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Subject:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse -- Students -- Research -- Periodicals
College students -- Research -- United States -- Periodicals
Journals
History
Creator:
GrawOzburn, Clement C.
Description:
The war years of the 1940’s saw unprecedented numbers of women entering the public realm in numerous traditionally male occupations. The war left scores of businesses, including baseball, without adequate labor. Driven by the fear that Major League Baseball would be shut-down for the duration of the war, Philip K. Wrigley created a women’s league as a back-up plan to keep baseball alive. The league existed from 1943 to 1954. It eventually became known as the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). The aim of this project was to look at the stories and experiences of the women of the AAGPBL through oral history interviews and relate those experiences to the larger social developments and norms of the 1940’s and 1950’s. The examination focused on how these women were able to acquire the skills necessary to play baseball at a professional level traditionally dominated by men; how as women they were able to slip through the cracks of societal norms while others accepted the predestination of home and family; what not conforming to societal norms meant for these women and their interaction with their communities; and how their personal outlook on life was influenced by their league experience. Some of the interviewees were from the La Crosse, Wisconsin, area.
Published as part of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume 7 (2004)