LA CROSSE HISTORY
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THE LA CROSSE AREA'S HISTORY, DIGITIZED

Press & News Media


Resources

—Press and News Media—


Subject:
La Crosse Tribune and Leader Press (La Crosse, Wis.)
Editorials -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
World War, 1939-1945 -- Public opinion -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Creator:
Erickson, Darryle
Description:
Adolph Hitler, Chancellor of Germany, spent the years 1933-1939 preparing his nation for war, He spent the years 1939-1945 in war; in the process he caused millions of deaths and destroyed much of European society. In addition, in defeat he gave the Russians an unparalleled opportunity to dominate Europe and Asia. The purpose of this study is to determine editorial opinion on the coming of World War II as expressed in the area newspaper. The paper examined was the La Crosse Tribune and Leader Press, edited by R. L. Bangsberg, with Sunday editorials by M. R. Byers, from October, 1933 to December, 1941. A reading of this newspaper reveals several tendencies clearly. The editorials leaned toward a policy of strict isolation from the beginning of Germany's rearmament, through the Anschluss, the Munich Conference, the signing of the Nazi-Soviet Pact, the attack on Poland, the Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, and the conquest of Denmark and Norway. On the occasion of Hitler's invasion and conquest of the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxemburg, the editorials softened the voice of isolation as rumblings for preparedness for war began to appear in them. The battles of France and Britain brought an awareness of the possibility that the United States might enter the war. The editorial voice urged and approved the war preparations the selection of a war cabinet, the destroyer-base exchange, the passage of the first peace time draft law, President Roosevelt's Four Freedom's speech and the Lend-Lease Act. As Hitler won more victories America moved closer to the brink of war in 1941. After Germany's conquest of Greece and Yugoslavia, the signing of the Russo-Japanese Neutrality Treaty, the freeze on Axis funds, the attack on Russia, and the Atlantic meeting of President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill, the editorials fully recognized that the United States was on the verge of complete participation in the war and gave approval.
UW-L Seminar Paper
Subject:
Press and politics -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Republican Party (Wis.) -- History
Elections -- Wisconsin
Wisconsin -- Politics and government -- 1848-1950
La Follette, Robert M. -- 1855-1925
Creator:
McQuin, James M.
Description:
The year 1904 produced a political battle in the Wisconsin Republican party that would affect the state's future for nearly a decade thereafter. The Republican party in Wisconsin was split into two factions in the late 1890's. Former Congressman Robert M. LaFollette's faction, the "insurgents" or "half-breeds" was opposed by the dominant Republican faction known as the "stalwarts." The 1904 gubernatorial campaign in the state of Wisconsin produced emotional factionalism in the state Republican party which spread into every community. The purpose of this study is to examine the editorial opinion expressed in three La Crosse, Wisconsin newspapers during the gubernatorial campaign of 1904 and, in so doing, to determine the position taken by each paper concerning the state Republican party strife and the key issues of the campaign. The three newspapers are the La Crosse Chronicle, the La Crosse Leader-Press and the La Crosse Tribune. A short overview of the 1904 campaign and election is followed by an examination of the editorial content of the three newspapers during the period from January 14, 1904 to November 9, 1904. The examination revealed several tendencies. First, the Leader-Press maintained a neutral stand on the gubernatorial campaign, but endorsed the primary election law referendum. Second, the Chronicle supported the stalwart candidates and denounced the primary election law referendum. Third, the Tribune initially maintained an independent political opinion but eventually abandoned that position and supported the Democratic Party and it's candidates. The Tribune argued that the primary election law referendum was not a political issue in the campaign.
UW-L Seminar Paper
Author:
Wisconsin State University (La Crosse)
Subject:
Editorials
Presidents -- United States -- Election -- 1912
La Crosse Leader-Press (La Crosse, Wis.)
La Crosse Tribune (La Crosse, Wis.)
Governors -- Wisconsin -- Election
Creator:
Birch, Charles W.
Description:
UW – La Crosse Seminar Paper
Description:
Taylor was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, in August 1857, to Amanda Hines, a free black woman. Taylor later reported that his father was Nathan Taylor, a slave. Hines was forced to leave Arkansas in 1859 as a consequence of a new law which required all free blacks to leave the state by 1 January 1860 or be sold as slaves. Hines died in Alton, Illinois, in 1861 or 1862, and young George was forced to live in “dry goods boxes” and fend for himself. In 1865 when he arrived in La Crosse, Wisconsin, onboard the “Hawkeye State,” a side-paddle vessel then operating on the upper Mississippi River. Taylor lived in La Crosse only one or two years, after which he was “bound out” to Nathan Smith of rural West Salem where he lived until he reached the age of 20 years. He attended Wayland University in Beaver Dam from 1877 to 1879, after which he settled in La Crosse and in the employ of Marcus “Brick” Pomeroy, editor of Pomeroy’s Democrat. From 1880 to 1885, Taylor wrote for several local papers and contributed articles to the Chicago Inter Ocean. In 1885, he was the editor of a newspaper supported financially by Frank “White Beaver” Powell, and eventually became an important player in Powell’s first two terms as mayor of La Crosse. Lastly, In 1886 and 1887, Taylor became a crucial figure and office holder in Wisconsin’s People’s Party and then its Union Labor Party. His Wisconsin Labor Advocate was the voice of Wisconsin’s labor party in 1886-1887. From 1891 to 1910, Taylor lived in Oskaloosa and Ottumwa, Iowa, where he published a national magazine called the Negro Solicitor. During this period he rose to prominence in national black politics, acting as president of the National Colored Men’s Protective Association and the National Negro Democratic League and served high office in various other black organizations. In 1904, Taylor was selected to lead the ticket of the National Negro Liberty Party for the office of president of the United States. From 1910 to 1925, Taylor retreated from the national stage and lived an active life in Jacksonville, Florida.
Library guide created by UWL, Murphy Library that contains links to primary as well as secondary sources
Subject:
La Crosse (Wis.). Police Dept. -- History
Justice, Administration of -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- History
Creator:
Layton, Gerald A.
Description:
In its early years, La Crosse, Wisconsin, was a typical frontier river town. Its tough and troublesome citizenry filled the police records with tales of crime and violence. This paper discusses the activities of the police court, the men who served as police justice, and the newspapers' attempts to start a campaign to purge the city of its evil-doers. The morals of La Crosse declined with the morals of the woods, as the lumberjacks and rivermen came to the city and spent their money on whisky and women. La Crosse had plenty of both to offer. As early as 1857, the residents of the city organized a vigilance committee to deal with its less than honorable segment of society. By 1862, the demand for law and order had resulted in the establishment of a police court whose task was to administer justice to La Crosse's numerous lawbreakers. The police court had the criminal jurisdiction of a justice of the peace within the limits of the city and exclusive jurisdiction of offenses against the ordinances of the city of La Crosse. From 1862 to 1882, four men served as police justices for the city. August Steinlein served as acting justice when the elected police justice could not perform his duties. These men handled over 8,000 cases ranging from the simplest misdemeanor to the heinous crime of murder. The Justice of the Police Court could fine and/or imprison persons guilty of breaking the law or refer a criminal to a higher court if the offense warranted such legal action. Without the police court and the men who served as police justices, La Crosse's transition from a frontier river town to an orderly, law-abiding community by 1885 may not have been possible.
UW-L Seminar Paper
Author:
Northern Illinois University
Subject:
Pomeroy, Mark M. 1833-1896
Newspaper publishing -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- Biography
Creator:
Ruth A. Tucker
Description:
A PhD dissertation completed in 1979 by Ruth Anne Tucker about Marcus M. "Brick" Pomeroy, noted newspaper publisher, writer, editor, and political activist.
Photocopy of typescript. Ann Arbor : University Microfilms, 1981. -- iv, 374 leaves ; 21 cm.; Thesis (Ph.D.)--Northern Illinois University, 1979.; Bibliography: leaves [356]-374.
Subject:
La Crosse (WIs.)--Newspapers
La Crosse (WIs.)--History
United States
Wisconsin
La Crosse
Copperhead movement
Newspaper editors--Wisconsin--La Crosse
Pomeroy, Mark M. (Mark Mills), 1833-1896
Wisconsin--Politics and government--1861-1865
Creator:
Harry Frederick Bangsberg 1928-1967
Description:
Marcus Mills Pomeroy or "Brick" Pomeroy is the subject of this thesis. He was the editor of the La Crosse Democrat newspaper who sided with Democrat extremists against Abraham Lincoln curing the Civil War.
"A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Course 16:273 in the Department of History in the Graduate College of the State University of Iowa."
Author:
publisher not identified
Subject:
United States
Wisconsin
La Crosse
Knutson, Milo G, 1917-
Mayors--Wisconsin--La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.)--Politics and government
Description:
a booklet created for campaign purposes giving a glimpse into Milo Knutson's work and political life that includes La Crosse business advertising; Knutson served as news director for WKTY radio and was mayor of La Crosse from 1955-1965 after which he turned his attention to the Wisconsin State Senate, serving there as a Republican from 1969-1977
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Thoms, Brandon -- Interviews
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Indians of North America
Description:
This interview includes Mr. Thoms discussing the following topics: Indian Reorganization Act (Wheeler-Howard Act, 1934), changes ca 1960s -- Lac Du Flambeau, relations with surrounding community, Minocqua, Wisconsin -- Living in Minocqua, Attending Lakeland High School, 1987 -- Lakeland high school, conflicts between white and Native American students, 1980s -- Racial animosity due to spearfishing regulations, ca late 1980s -- Experience with spearfishing, reservation support to practice spearfishing -- Protesting Native American spear fishermen at boat landings, 1986/87 -- Victimization at Lakeland High School, violent words and actions -- Protest marches led by anti-treaty organization PARR (Protect America’s Rights and Resources), 1988 -- Teachers unwilling to defend Native American students, Lakeland High School -- Violence against Native American traditions, ceremonial drum destruction -- Parent protesters influence students to bully Native students, death threats, Lakeland High School -- Media portrayal and police presence, boat landings protests -- Use of traditional remedies to calm Native Americans during protest, tobacco, sage, sweet grass, and cedar -- Lac Du Flambeau lawsuit against the organization Stop Treaty Abuse-Wisconsin, Inc., 1992 -- Joint committee study, health and state of lakes, findings prove no damage caused by spear fishing, Report Title = "Casting Light Upon the Waters: A Joint Fishery Assessment of the Wisconsin Ceded Territory," 1991, Document produced by: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC), (http://dnr.wi.gov/wnrmag/html/stories/2005/aug05/treaty.htm), 1990.
00:00:10—Indian Reorganization Act (Wheeler-Howard Act, 1934), changes ca 1960s
00:01:05—Lac Du Flambeau, relations with surrounding community, Minocqua, Wisconsin
00:02:10—Living in Minocqua, Attending Lakeland High School, 1987
00:03:45—Lakeland high school, conflicts between white and Native American students, 1980s
00:04:30—Racial animosity due to spearfishing regulations, ca late 1980s
00:06:10—Experience with spearfishing, reservation support to practice spearfishing
00:09:35—Protesting Native American spear fishermen at boat landings, 1986/87
00:12:20—Victimization at Lakeland High School, violent words and actions
00:15:35—Protest marches led by anti-treaty organization PARR (Protect America’s Rights and Resources), 1988
00:18:25—Teachers unwilling to defend Native American students, Lakeland High School
00:19:50—Violence against Native American traditions, ceremonial drum destruction
00:23:35—Parent protesters influence students to bully Native students, death threats, Lakeland High School
00:27:30—Media portrayal and police presence, boat landings protests
00:28:25—Use of traditional remedies to calm Native Americans during protest, tobacco, sage, sweet grass, and cedar
00:30:30—Lac Du Flambeau lawsuit against the organization Stop Treaty Abuse-Wisconsin, Inc., 1992
00:33:10—Joint committee study, health and state of lakes, findings prove no damage caused by spear fishing, Report Title = "Casting Light Upon the Waters: A Joint Fishery Assessment of the Wisconsin Ceded Territory," 1991, Document produced by: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC), (http://dnr.wi.gov/wnrmag/html/stories/2005/aug05/treaty.htm), 1990
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Purcell, Gene P -- Interviews
WLSU (Radio station : La Crosse, Wis.)
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Radio -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- History
Radio stations -- Employees
Radio producers and directors -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Public radio -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Description:
Purcell talks about his career as a disc jockey in the 1970s and 80s. He expresses his passion for radio and working with musicians, and talks about some history with La Crosse radio and UWL radio.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Haraldson, John -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Norwegian Americans -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Shoe industry -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Retail trade -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Clubs -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse -- History
Westby (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
Description:
Haraldson begins his interview discussing his family history, early childhood in Norway, and his immigration journey to the U.S. as a young man. He first arrived in Westby, where he worked on a farm. When he came to La Crosse, he began working in the shoe trade. Topics include but are not limited to: cobbling in Norway, railroads as a form of transportation at the turn of the century, Norwegian community in Westby (WI), tobacco farming, Arenz Shoe Store, Fry Shor Company, WWI, local shoe-making industry, businessmen's club, Adolf Gundersen, Trinity Lutheran Church, night school and furthering education, store fire, Judge Lincoln Neprud.
Tape 2
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Gilbertson, John P. -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Postal service -- Employees
Postal service -- History
Letter carriers -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Postmasters -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Recreation -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
Description:
John P. Gilbertson begins his interview by discussing his Norwegian family history. His interview largely focuses on La Crosse social life and recreation, as well as his career as a letter carrier. Topics include but are not limited to: saw mills, railroads, Coon Valley, family working-class occupations, the Great Depression, history of the La Crosse Post Office, steamboats, La Crosse Inter-State Fair, farm technology, newspaper and press industry, education in La Crosse, Wisconsin Business University, the circus, segregation from Ho-Chunk community and community racism, Bartl Brewery, anti-Black racism and interracial marriage, river and lumber industries, Goosetown, gambling houses and City policies, anti-German discrimination, WWI, automobiles, federal government, development of the La Crosse Normal School (now UW-L), Hoeschler family, medical history, Adolf Gundersen, early Ho-Chunk community members, early Black American community members, La Crosse Historical Society, Nathan Myrick, local politics, Wisconsin Progressive Movement, corruption in La Crosse Police Department, personal sentiments towards communities with different identities than his own (Indigenous, Black American, and Jewish).
Note: This interview has sections of poor audio quality.
Tape 2
Tape 3
Tape 4
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Van Loon, Maude -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Farm life -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Social life and customs
New Amsterdam (La Crosse County, Wis.) -- History
Description:
Van Loon discusses her ancestors' 1856 emigration from the Netherlands to Wisconsin, where they settled in New Amsterdam. She focuses on her father, John Van Loon, and also discusses general family life and her childhood growing up on a farm in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Topics also discussed include but are not limited to: ancestry, immigration from Holland, LaFleur family, New Amsterdam, Native Americans, Presbyterian Church, marriage and work, Childhood memories, diseases, Joseph Losey, her childhood home, her parents railroad tramps, birthday celebrations, farm animals, Christmas celebrations, farming and harvesting, education, Perkins family, Black Americans, childhood games, bluff hiking, agricultural and horticultural societies, traffic concerns with horses and cars, horse races, bird watching, food and cooking, farm labor, as well as local newspapers papers.
Warning, some bits of this recording has sound issues and the audio is incomprehensible.
Tape 2
Tape 3
Tape 4
Tape 5
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Bice, Raymond C. -- Interviews
Wisconsin -- Politics and government
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
Raymond Bice discusses his childhood and early life, talking of fishing, hanging out at rail yards, his school delinquency, some of his teachers and his principal, as well as his story of eventually dropping out of high school. He also talks about his adult life, including his political career and the greater political climate of La Crosse, specifically at the County level. Bice talks in detail about the Trapper's bill and law, the Speed Limit bill and law, the Highway Safety bill and law, Liquor tax, and lobbying groups. He also discusses general topics like the Great Depression, Prohibition and bootlegging, neighborhood rivalry, and Syrian immigration to La Crosse.
Tape 2
Author:
Press Publishing Company
Subject:
La Crosse (Wis.) -- Newspapers
Description:
A special illustrated edition the newspaper titled "The Sunday Press from 1904. Articles include politics and progressive mindset, transportation, Oak Grove Cemeteries and public buildings, art and architecture, women, the lumbering business, philanthropic endeavors, beer brewing, banking, mills and the agricultural industries, and some advertising.
Subject:
Editorials
La Crosse Tribune (La Crosse, Wis.)
Treaty of Versailles (1919)
Creator:
Moderski, Audrey
Description:
UW-L Seminar Paper
Author:
Geo. E. Taylor & Co.
Creator:
Taylor, George E.
Description:
This collection includes the newspaper and its transcriptions. The Wisconsin Labor Advocate was a newspaper published in La Crosse in 1886-1887 with political and financial backing from Dr. D. Frank "White Beaver" Powell. La Crosse was a hotbed of Labor political party activity in the 1880s and the Wisconsin Labor Advocate was one of at least four La Crosse area Labor-related newspapers from that time. What makes the Wisconsin Labor Advocate unique was its editor and owner: George Edwin Taylor. Taylor was an African-American, born in Arkansas in 1857. As a black business owner, he was an anomaly in La Crosse, Wisconsin, in the 1880s. Taylor got his start in publishing working at other La Crosse newspapers. He also became increasingly interested in politics as reflected in his editorship of the Wisconsin Labor Advocate. The last existing edition of the paper dates from August 6, 1887 and George Edwin Taylor left La Crosse soon afterwards. He maintained a life-long interest in politics and by 1904 had become involved in an all African-American political party called the National Liberty Party. Taylor accepted the nomination of that party in 1904 as its candidate for the office of the U.S. President. In doing so, Taylor was the first candidate of a national African-American party for the U.S. presidency.