LA CROSSE HISTORY
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THE LA CROSSE AREA'S HISTORY, DIGITIZED

Hydrology & Water Resources


Resources

—Hydrology and Water Resources—


Author:
United States. National Park Service
Subject:
Dams -- Mississippi River -- History -- 20th century
Locks (Hydraulic engineering) -- Mississippi River -- History -- 20th century
Mississippi River -- Channelization -- History -- 20th century
Creator:
O'Brien, William Patrick
Rathbun, Mary Yeater
O'Bannon, Patrick
Description:
History of the 9-foot channel project in the upper Mississippi River to aid river navigation and commerce.
Item donated by the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee (UMRCC) to Murphy Library in 2018. Part of the UMRCC Collection housed at Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.
Subject:
Nitrates -- Environmental aspects
Groundwater -- Pollution
Wells -- Testing
La Crosse County (Wis.)
Creator:
O'Donnell, Meghan
Description:
Nitrate, a naturally occurring ion in the environment is one of the most common causes of contaminated groundwater. The primary concern with ingestion of nitrate contaminated groundwater is a condition called infant methemoglobinemia and recent studies have found associations between exposure to nitrate contaminated groundwater, cancer, and reproductive and developmental outcomes. Because testing for nitrate is the responsibility of the private well owner, efforts to assess knowledge, awareness, and practices related to nitrate well water testing for the purposes of developing or improving educational efforts was investigated by use of a mailed survey among randomly selected private well owners in La Crosse County, Wisconsin. A total of 165 (out of 500) surveys were returned and analyzed. Awareness of nitrate well water testing (yes or no) and tested for nitrate (yes or no) was cross tabulated and found to be significant (Asymp. Sig. 2-sided 0.000, Pearson chi-square value 37.73). Among those that were aware of nitrate well water testing, 69% had tested their well water for nitrate and 31% had not tested their well water for nitrate suggesting the need for educational efforts, particularly for high risks groups. In addition, efforts aligned with encouraging regular testing practices should be a priority.
UW-L Master's These
Author:
Govt. Print Off.
Subject:
Freshwater biology -- Mississippi River
Mississippi River
Creator:
Galtsoff, Paul S. (Paul Simon), 1887-1979
Description:
From Bulletin of the Bureau of Fisheries, vol. 39, 1923-24.; Bibliography: p. 434-438.
Author:
Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (Geological Survey)
Creator:
Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (Geological Survey)
Description:
This site includes aerial obliques (photos), surface obliques (ground level photos) and video of the La Crosse and Coulee region of the Mississippi River suffering effects of flooding in April 2001.
Prepared by the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center.
Subject:
Ecological surveys -- Wisconsin -- Lake Neshonoc
Ecology -- Wisconsin -- Lake Neshonoc
Neshonoc, Lake (Wis.)
Creator:
Ritter, Paul Gerard
Description:
Lake Neshonoc is a reservoir (243 ha) on the La Crosse River in the Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin. Water sample were collected from the four influent waters (Adam's Valley Creek, Burn's Creek, Dutch Creek, and the La Crosse River), the marsh upstream from the lake, four sites within the lake, and one site downstream from the dam. Two deep water sites in the lake were sampled at the surface, middle, and near-bottom of the water column. Samples were collected from all sites from February through September, 1985, at which time the lake was drained for dam repairs. Influent samples were collected through December, 1985. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, and Secchi disk transparency were recorded in the field. Non-filterable residues, specific conductance, pH, total alkalinity, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, ortho-phosporus, and total phosporus were analyzed in the laboratory. Total alkalinity, pH, and conductivity were typical of a well-buffered lake. Dissolved oxygen in the lake fluctuated from top to bottom on a biweekly basis during the summer. Of the influent waters, Adam's Valley Creek consistently had the highest concentrations of nutrients. Within the lake, nitrate and ortho-phosphorus concentrations decreased 35% from the inflow sites to the outflow site. This was likely due to assimilation by phtyoplankton, which may have increased the biological oxygen demand and decreased the dissolved oxygen in the deeper waters (3 m) of the lake. The La Crosse River supplies a majority of the water entering Lake Neshonoc, which explains the similarity between the lake and river water chemistry. The lake has lost 73 ha in the past 29 years. 23% of its original surface area. Most of the loss occurred with the encroachment of the marsh. The lake volume has decreased O.42x106m3 during the past 19 years. Hydraulic residence time for Lake Neshonoc is 4.85 days. Improvements in watershed management must be implemented to prolong the benefits of this reservoir. Subject
UW-L Master's Thesis
Subject:
Freshwater biology -- Wisconsin
La Crosse River (Wis.) -- Limnology
Black River (Taylor County-La Crosse County, Wis.) -- Limnology
Mississippi River -- Limnology
Creator:
Cary, George
Description:
A seven-month study of the phytoplankton populations and water quality of the La Crosse and Mississippi Rivers and the back water slough of the old Black River channel below navigation pool #7, hereafter referred to as the "Black" River, was initiated on May 19, 1971 and terminated on November 20, 1971. Nine sampling stations were chosen in such a manner as to monitor the different channels above and below their point of convergence. Phytoplankton samples were collected at 3 depths, while samples used in the determination of chemical parameters were obtained at the 2 m depth. Six major groups of algae were found in the study area. These were the Chrysophyceae, Pyrrophyta, Euglenophyta, Bacillariophyceae, Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta. The latter three made up the major portion of the phytoplankton, both in numbers and diversity. The "Black" and Mississippi Rivers were found to be similar with regard to phytoplankton composition. The chemical parameters of the two study areas were also similar, with the exception of total hardness. It was observed that the total hardness concentration was lower in the "Black" River than in the Mississippi River. The La Crosse River presented a seemingly unfavorable set of conditions for the maintenance of phytoplankton populations. The major organisms of this river were various species of Ulothrix. This was also the only genus to occur in bloom proportions in the La Crosse River. The La Crosse River, besides being distinct from the "Black" and Mississippi Rivers with regard to phytoplankton composition, was also distinct from the latter two on the basis of turbidity and settleable matter.
UW-L Master's Thesis
Author:
Upper Mississippi River Basin Coordinating Committee
Subject:
Water resources development -- Mississippi River Watershed
Water resources development -- Middle West
Mississippi River Watershed
Mississippi River Valley
Creator:
Upper Mississippi River Basin Coordinating Committee
Description:
Appendix H: Water Supply and Quality Control (vol. IV)
Item donated by the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee (UMRCC) to Murphy Library in 2018. Part of the UMRCC Collection housed at Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.