LA CROSSE HISTORY
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THE LA CROSSE AREA'S HISTORY, DIGITIZED

Students


Resources

—Students—


Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Subject:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse -- Students -- Research -- Periodicals
College students -- Research -- United States -- Periodicals
Journals
Mathematics
Creator:
Craker, Dana E.
Description:
Nearly fifty percent of students may lose interest in science by the third grade, and the number of students preparing for a science-related career is declining. Several factors, including gender, expected achievement and previous science experiences could influence a student’s attitude toward science. This study analyzed the attitudes toward science of students enrolled in entry-level general education courses at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse in the areas of personal confidence, usefulness of the subject, perception of the subject as a male domain, and perception of the teacher’s attitude. Males were found to have more confidence than females, and females perceive science as a male domain more than men. Expected achievement and attitude toward science were shown to be strongly related. The number of science and math courses taken in high school has a direct impact on a student’s attitude toward science.
Published as part of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume 9 (2006)
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Subject:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse -- Students -- Research -- Periodicals
College students -- Research -- United States -- Periodicals
Journals
History
Creator:
Reckwerdt, Alexander
Description:
In 1914 Hugh Downey was an average La Crosse State Normal School (LCSNS) student, and a stoic male role model for the other men on the university's campus. Downey's first appearance in the 1914 yearbook was in the third junior class photograph. It presents the viewer with an average looking man sitting in front of his peers, but in reality this man was far from average (see Fig. 1).2 As a member of the LCSNS's eight-man basketball team, Downey helped lead them to become the champions of the Northern Inter-Normal Conference of Wisconsin (see Fig. 2).3 Handicapped with his light weight, Downey was accredited with always being filled with grit and stamina. His smooth work and quick dodging also always kept his guards guessing.4
Published as part of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume 8 (2005)
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Description:
Brenda Lauderdale was born in Alabama, but spent most of her childhood in the Chicago area. She came to La Crosse for college. Lauderdale mostly discusses growing up in housing projects in Chicago in the 1950s and her family life. In 1975, Lauderdale enrolled in UWL, and some of her interview focuses on anti-Black racism and discrimination in La Crosse and at UWL.
Tape 2
Description:
Charles Conrad was a La Crosse area resident for his whole life, born in the late 1800s and growing up on a farm just outside of the city. In his interview, he discusses subjects like: his ancestry, Indigenous peoples, education, family life, working at a saw mill and grocery store, religion, movie theaters, the Red light district, Prohibition, clamming, the Klu Klux Klan (KKK), Black families, racism, early doctors and home remedies, and the Great Depression.
Tape 2
Tape 3
Tape 4
Tape 5
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Gershon, Ernest -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
Ernest Gershon discusses attending the Phy. Ed. program at UWL in the mid-1900s. He speaks about being involved with gymnastics, dance, track and field, taking classes with Hans Reuter, and Reuter's impact on the university. Gershon also discusses gender roles in sports education.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Gautsch, Floyd -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Physical education and training -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Physical education teachers -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Description:
Floyd Gautsch discusses attending the Phy. Ed. program at UWL in the mid-1900s. He speaks about being a student athlete, taking classes with Hans Reuter, and Reuter's impact on the university.
Subject:
Lazinger, Joel P -- Interviews
Peace Corps (U.S.)
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest movements
Peace movements -- Wisconsin
Government, Resistance to -- Wisconsin
Civil disobedience -- Wisconsin -- Madison
Student movements -- Wisconsin -- Madison
Colombia -- History
Madison (Wis.)
Description:
A typed transcript of the interview with Joel Lazinger, who discusses growing up in a patriotic Jewish family, serving in the Peace Corps in Colombia, and resisting the actions of the United States government in the Vietnam War. He describes anti-war rallies and demonstrations and the Army Math Research Center bombing at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.
1 sound tape reel (approximately 120 min.) : analog, 3 3/4 ips ; 7 in. + 1 transcript (80 leaves ; 28 cm) + 2 audiocassettes.
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Nevers, John -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
00:00:01 -- Nevers, background, 1938
00:00:58 -- Nevers, opinion of Hans Reuter
00:01:53 -- Reuter, student interactions
00:03:25 -- Reuter, class discipline
00:04:05 -- Reuter, strict grading
00:05:34 -- Reuter, demonstrations
00:07:55 -- Reuter, athletics and coaching
00:08:54 -- Student teaching program
00:10:01 -- Reuter, local and state involvement
00:11:54 -- Reuter, strengths and weaknesses
00:12:48 -- Reuter, gymnastics fundamentals
00:14:13 -- Dance classes
00:14:42 -- Reuter, inventions
00:15:46 -- Reuter, staff opinions
00:16:38 -- Marching tactics class
00:18:50 -- Reuter, teaching philosophy
00:21:18 -- Adapting to changes in the field
00:24:32 -- Reuter, Phi Epsilon Kappa involvement
00:25:50 -- Dance, gender roles
00:27:11 -- Reuter, using techniques in public schools
00:28:39 -- Reuter, comparing to other professors
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Miller, Leon Warren, 1896-1991 -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Athletics -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Athletic directors -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Description:
00:00:23 -- Expansion, Physical Education program
00:02:07 -- Typical school day
00:03:43 -- Philosophy, Physical education
00:05:01 -- Reuter's teaching background
00:06:33 -- UWL Athletic Committee, Reuter's impact
00:08:40 -- Miller's student experience
00:09:55 -- Miller's teaching experience
00:12:26 --Reuter, relationship with staff members
00:15:40 -- Program additions and removals
00:18:59 -- UWL's physical education program
00:20:50 -- Specialized staff members
00:22:53 -- Hans Reuter, public school impact
00:25:01 -- Creating uniform curriculum
00:25:21 -- Student-teaching observation
00:27:30 -- State influence
00:29:15 -- Critics of Hans Reuter
00:32:32 -- Staff animosity
00:33:54 -- Hans Reuter, teaching methods
00:34:50 -- Inventions
00:37:43 -- Administration changes
00:38:49 -- Reuter's education
00:40:01 -- State and national level, Reuter's impact
Author:
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Oral History Program
Subject:
Jorgenson, Ole -- Interviews
Oral history
Oral history -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Interviews -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
La Crosse (Wis.) -- History
Description:
Ole Jorgenson attended the La Crosse Normal School (now UWL) and was enrolled in the Physical Education program there. For much of this interview, Jorgeson discusses Hans Reuter, who was instrumental in creating a nationally-renowned Phy. Ed. program that continues today at UWL. Jorgeson also touches on topics like student life in the 1920s and the post-WWI era.
Subject:
Harry Spence School (La Crosse, Wis.)
Children with disabilities --Education (Elementary) -- Wisconsin -- La Crosse
Creator:
Medinger, Berniece
Description:
It was the purpose of this study. (1) to determine by means of a questionnaire the opinions and attitudes of parents in the Harry Spence Elementary School district concerning mainstreaming of handicapped children into the regular classroom! (2) to ascertain whether there was a relationship between opinions and attitudes toward mainstreaming and such variables as type of residence, annual income, leadership in the community, levels of education, and age of parents! (3) to review the literature and research studies pertaining to mainstreaming the handicapped child! and (4) to formulate any other conclusions from the results of the survey which may be regarded as significant by the surveyor. Fifty families from a random sampling of parents whose children were enrolled in the Harry Spence Elementary School were sent a seventeen-question questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three parts. The first part consisted of questions describing the respondent by sex, annual income, type of residence, level of education, age, and community leadership. The second part consisted of questions pertaining to the respondent's personal views on how he felt about the handicapped when he was in the elementary grades and in high school. The final part consisted of questions about the respondent's views toward mainstreaming the various types of handicapped children into the regular classroom. Questions in parts two and three could be answered yes, no, or uncertain. There were provisions for comments by the respondent on these statements. The raw data was tabulated and treated with the statistical formula chi-square. The 1130 IBM computer at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was used in analyzing the data. The data was also reported in percentages. The findings from the survey of Harry Spence Elementary School parents indicated that there was a significant difference in responses to two questions. The null hypotheses were rejected. It was also noted by this investigator that there were two other statements which were statistically close enough to being rejected to merit special notice or consideration. The percent of the responses throughout the survey indicated general agreement in attitudes and opinions among the Harry Spence Elementary School parents in regard to mainstreaming most types of handicapped children into the regular classroom.
UW-L Seminar Paper